Tigers-Tora

 

The Tiger-Tora  features strongly in Japanese art
and we have some of the very best quality representation of these

Notes on artists paintings of Tigers in the far east: The tigers in paintings from different countries are also different. Tigers in Chinese paintings usually have a round and flat face with huge bodies and their tails are relatively short compared to their bodies. Tigers in Chinese paintings can reflect the generosity of the nation. 
In South Korea, tigers are elements which are very close to humans and are usually glorified or personated. Tigers in South Korea's paintings can reflect the flexibility in the nationís philosophy of life.

Japan did not have tigers in the past, and the tigers in Japanese paintings are quite unique and are neither like China's nor like Korea's. The Japanese painting named, "The Tiger Coming out of a Bamboo Grove" which uses a bamboo grove as the background is quite different from tiger paintings from Korea which usually use pine trees as backgrounds. After the Meiji Reform, tigers in Japanese paintings all became ferocious and quite oppressive. Tigers in Japanese paintings can reflect the individuality and the Bushido spirit. The name Tora is Tiger in Japanese

The Japanese have been fascinated by tigers for centuries. One of the earliest tiger paintings to be discovered in Japan may have been painted in the seventh century and was discovered on the wall of a tomb chamber near the city of Asuka.

Tigers are not indigenous to Japan, however these powerful cats so captivated Japanese imaginations that early artists produced innumerable paintings of them over the course of their historyómost without the benefit of firsthand observations. Early Japanese artists were following a precedent established in China, where tigers roamed in great numbers and achieved religious and cosmological symbolism.

According to traditional Asian mythology, tigers are identified with yin, the female principle, as well as autumn and wind. The dragon, representing yang, is believed to create mists and rain and is associated with spring and rejuvenation. Tigers and dragons are sometimes paired together as these images represent opposite principles in nature. Japanese artists Kishi Ganku and Kishi Renzan depict tigers and dragons amid swirling clouds.

     

 

 

  

 

1: Okamura Keiho (b c1920) Tora 1950

The style is from the post-war era more in the range of 1950s. It is a wonderful painting. Keihi was born in the 1920's

This is a fascinating scroll both for the artistic quality and  realism. Being restored £225 with box.-Reserved

 


Before restoration: The scroll was not very happy !


2: Gyokuden Murase 1852-1917 Tora A magnificent scroll painted by the son of the famous scroll painter Murase. This scroll has been restored and remounted as the existing silk mounts were, as you can see, badly damaged. Scroll is being sold with a scroll by his father and as a set. Please see Sofuku-Scroll Pairs and you can see the results of our restoration work.

 Gyokuden Murase 1852-1917 was the son of Soseki Murase 1823-1878 -we have a scroll by the father. The Shijo School, Surimono
Tora has been remounted. onto new silks and the painting professionally restored The Tora in a Bamboo Grove. A striking and very dramatic rendering of a Tiger is absolutely stunning. The Tiger reflects the spirit of Bushido, brave , knowledgeable and confident.

Tigers, considered to be brave, cruel, forceful and terrifying, are the symbol of power and lordliness. In ancient times, people usually compared emperors or grandees with the tiger. Court officials often said that 'accompanying the emperor is just like being at the side of a tiger'. There are also many legends on hunting tigers dealing with struggling against evil might.

People born in the year of the tiger are tolerant, staunch, valiant, and respected. In their middle age, their fate may be uneven, but afterwards will enjoy a bright prospect. Their shortcoming is to project themselves before others. But most women under the tiger sign are intelligent, faithful and virtuous

 
 

After restoration, the painting has been restored and new silk mounts have been added. It now forms part of a pair of scrolls with a scroll by the artists father see Sofuku-Scroll Pairs

Notes on artists painting s of Tigers in the far east: The tigers in paintings from different countries are also different. Tigers in Chinese paintings usually have a round and flat face with huge bodies and their tails are relatively short compared to their bodies. Tigers in Chinese paintings can reflect the generosity of the nation. 
In South Korea, tigers are elements which are very close to humans and are usually glorified or personated.  Tigers in South Korea's paintings can reflect the flexibility in the nationís philosophy of life.
Japan did not have tigers in the past, and the tigers in Japanese paintings are quite unique and are neither like China's nor like Korea's. The Japanese painting named, "The Tiger Coming out of a Bamboo Grove" which uses a bamboo grove as the background is quite different from tiger paintings from Korea which usually use pine trees as backgrounds. After the Meiji Reform, tigers in Japanese paintings all became ferocious and quite oppressive. Tigers in Japanese paintings can reflect the individuality and the Bushido spirit. The name Tora is Tiger in Japanese

 

3: Tiger in Bamboo Grove

A magnificent painting of a hunting Siberian Tiger. Painted with Bamboo , this is a depiction of strength and power of determination. Tora is a symbol of courage.

Signature is Kanseki  recently remounted and with a beautiful Antique Kimono silk covered box  £190

 

 

 


Sawaki Koudou 3

4: This is an amazing painting of a Tigress with her cub. A scroll that depicts protection. Painted by Kodo 'Tora and Cub'

Kodo Tora and Cub 81x 28.  Mother Tiger with her cub.
A scroll that depicts family protection and security. 
Now sold

Sawaki Kodo (Koudou)1880~1965

Sawaki Koudou lost his parents when he was a little child.

He became a monk in Eiheiji, one of the main temples of Soutou school.

He entered the Buddhist priesthood under Master Sawaki Koho(kouhou) in Soushinji.

He had never settled in the same temple for any length of time, but he changed his temple a lot, described ''Kodo the homeless'' or ''Master of locomotion''. (always moving)

He served positions as a professor at the University of Komazawa, a superintendent of Soujiji.

He was one of the remarkable priests of the Zen Buddhism in the Japanese modern ages.

This is possibly one of his better scrolls pained in later life circa 1950 or later.

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Tora -Tiger scroll. Soseki Tora-Siberian Tiger

Signature of the renowned Chikuho Mizuta 1883-1958

He was born in Osaka in 1883 
and studied painting with Chikugai Himejima 

He became a Nanga style Painter.
His given name was Chuji.
His younger brothers were Mizuta Kenzan and Kaname Juhei.

He was also known for his Sansui landscape view pictures.
He established the Japan Nanga Institute with Kohno Shuson, Tajika Chikuson and Yamada Kaido.
He was also a judge of both the Teiten Exhibition and the Shin-Bunten Exhibition.


He died in 1958 at the age of 75. 

painted in 1930 £225

The silk used for this box is a rare antique Kimono Silk in what is called rain pattern. A two tone silk that shimmers beautifully and I thought was perfect for this scroll.


Stalking Tiger-  With Japanese Pawlona Box
Thumbnails Pix-Click for larger image 77x140 cm. ( 30.5 inches x 55 inches) £175.