Marriage

 The subject of Jo and Uba is one that represents a good marriage.

 

 

 

It represents a scene from a Noh play
based on the subject of the Eternal Couple from the Legend of Takasago.Jo and Uba were supposed to have fallen in love when young,and after living to a very old age their spirits came to abide in pine trees,one on the beach at Takasago in Harima, and the other at Sumiyoshi in Sesshu near Osaka.Their spirits returned on moonlit nights in human form with rakes to continue their work of clearing the pine needles on Takasago Beach.

Jo and Uba are therefore the Gods of Marriage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The Scroll painting is by the late 19th, early 20th century painter Bansul and the size is 71 inches long by 23 inches wide. The Scroll has its own wooden artists box. 295

A word may be said also regarding the curious associations of animals and plants, to which some symbolism originally attached, but which apparently have been repeated very much like the copies of Chinese pictures, out of respect for tradition only. Amongst others will be noted the Quail and Millet, Peacock and Peony, Shishi and Peony, Swallow and Willow, Tiger and Bamboo, Plum Blossom and Moon, Chidori and Waves, Deer and Maple, Boar and Lespedeza, most of which are of frequent occurrence. The Snake is also often shown coiled around a Tortoise sometimes with jewel (Tamo), reminiscent of the Snake and Egg Myth and then associated with Bishamon.

CRANE, Emblem of longevity, attribute of SEIOBO, JUROJIN, FUKURO- ~ . KUJIU, TOBOSAKU, JoFUKU, WASOBIOYE, OSHIKIO, YoRITOMO, ToYU, Jo and UBA, KOHAKU. KAXGAI Sennin ; ISETSU ; KODOKWA ; TEIREII. CRANE, CONCH SHELL, emblem of the Yamabushi

PINE (Matsu).  Emblem of strength, endurance, longevity, because it is believed that its sap turns into amber after a thousand years; the "Sea Pine" is a fossilised wood, almost translucent, pieces of which were much prized as netsuke.

PINE, red and black, emblematic of happy marriage. ,

TORTOISE. (freely crossed meaning with Turtle) Emblem of Longevity.

Tsuru: The Japanese Crane

Many classical Japanese folktales and paintings have appeared, featuring the beauty of tsuru in their long necks and legs. They are winter migratory birds, that fly to Japan in October from Siberia and Mongolia, returning the following year in March. In Japan they are valued especially as animals symbolizing long life and are often used for festive designs and decorations. Senbazuru (One Thousand Cranes) of origami (folded paper) are sent to the sick to pray for recovery from illness and for long life.  Cranes are also birds that mate for life and as this is such an auspicious behaviour, giving such a scroll to a newly married couple or for a wedding anniversary is a profound and meaningful thing to do.

Please look at the three different Crane sections for more wonderful Scrolls