ACCENT AND ANTIQUE OBJECTS FOR DISPLAY

Small, unique and very beautiful antique figures
 of people and animals for display in the Tokonoma,
with Bonsai as an accent or for display with a scroll
       
Depiction of GwanYin in white robes meditating

Gwanyin( Guanyin Pusa, Avalokiteśvara-Mahāyāna bodhisattva, Guanshiyin, Chenrezig, Kwun Yum or Kun Yum, Gwanse-eum, Quán Thế Âm, Phra Mae Kuan Im,
Kabyeeb, Dewi Kwan Im)
Guanyin is the bodhisattva associated with compassion as venerated by East Asian Buddhists, usually as a female. The name Guanyin is short for Guanshiyin which means "Observing the Sounds (or Cries) of the World". She is also sometimes referred to as Guanyin Pusa (simplified Chinese: 观音菩萨; traditional Chinese: 觀音菩薩; pinyin: Guānyīn Púsà; Wade–Giles: Kuan-yin Pu-sah; literally "Bodhisattva Guanyin") Some Buddhists believe that when one of their adherents departs from this world, they are placed by Guanyin in the heart of a lotus then sent to the western pure land of Sukhāvatī.

It is generally accepted among east Asian adherents that Guanyin originated as the Sanskrit Avalokiteśvara (अवलोकितेश्वर). Commonly known in English as the Mercy Goddess or Goddess of Mercy, Guanyin is also revered by Chinese Taoists (sometimes called Daoists) as an Immortal. However, in Taoist mythology, Guanyin has other origination stories which are not directly related to Avalokiteśvara.

A blanc de chine porcelain figurine of the Goddess of Mercy, Kwan-yin

Dimension: approx 10" tall

Beautiful and serene with a high level of detail in the drapery and decoration. There is a red diamond shaped mark to the base. The figurine is in good vintage condition - the tip of one little finger is missing and the hand appears to have been glued at the wrist (see photo 2). There is the tiniest fleabite to one petal and a tiny manufacturing flaw to the left side. All of this is easily restored without a great deal of expense and effort.

Chinese Deity figure of Kwan-yin

Chinese figure of Kwan-yin standing on a lotus blossom, which is one of the main symbols of Buddhist purity, since
it a beautiful flower that grows out of mud. The meaning is that our hearts should be pure like the lotus flower, even
though our lives might be surrounded by dirty (or impure) people and situations.

The price for this statue would normally be  in excess of  £600 but we are selling this for £80 which leaves enough margin for a repair.

 

 
     
     

 

 

 


 

A FANTASTIC CARVED WOODEN BUDDHA..HAND CARVED FROM
ONE PIECE OF SOLID HARDWOOD........16CMS TALL,16CMS WIDE AND 8CMS DEEP

£65 Including Stand £85




 


A soapstone pair of Yifan Zhang the Cat Goddess in her personage as the goddess and as her earthly presence as a cat.
Yifan Zhang- Cat goddess, led a legion of cats to uphold righteousness before the
Shang Era. Descendant of Huangdi the Yellow Emperor a part-real, part-legendary
personage who is credited with founding the Chinese nation around 4,000 BC Zhayu (詐窳)
The cat has long been revered in China since the legend of Yifan Zhang In the early years
BC Over the centuries these symbols are referred to as Cat Goddess. Their images were used
to adorn many treasures in the home -Including the pillow These pillows were used instead of
a soft pillow that was thought to rob the body of vitality. They were also used to recline while
smoking in much earlier time when the Chinese elevated the art to a refined pastime. Since that
time ,pillows of cats and children have become collectors items . Yifan Zhang The Cat was
thought to insure long life and luck - Figure of Goddess is 10.5cm tall. Both are mounted onto a base


 

This is a porcelain figure of Jurojiin 10 inches tall. Finely made with no damage or repairs.
There is a faint embossed mark Chinese early 2oth century, Better images will be made soon. £90

Jurōjin 寿老人
Origin = China. Identified with Laozi (Jp. = Rōjinseishi), the founder of Chinese Toaism

God of Wisdom & Longevity. Virtue = Longevity.

Also spelled Jurojin.
Long white beard, knobbly staff with scoll of life attached; tortoise, deer, stag, crane; in same body as Fukurokuju (the pair represent two different manifestations of the same deity); scroll said to hold the secret to longevity; sometimes carries a drinking vessel, as he reportedly loves rice wine (sake). Popular among teachers, professors, and scientists.


 

 

Cicadas carved from Amber


5x3 inches £65


5"x1.8''x1.5inches £65
In Japan, the cicada is associated with the summer season. The songs of the cicada are often used in Japanese film and television to indicate the scene is taking place in the summer. The song of a particular cicada, called "tsuku-tsuku boshi", is said to indicate the end of summer, and it is called so because of its particular call. During the summer, it is a pastime for children to collect both cicadas and the shells left behind when moulting.

In Japan, the cicada carries further philosophical connotations of re-birth. Since the cicada emerges from the ground to sing every summer, it is a symbol of reincarnation. Of special importance is the fact that the cicada moults, leaving behind an empty shell. But furthermore, since the cicada only lives for the short period of time long enough to attract a mate with its song and complete the process of fertilization, they are seen as a symbol of evanescence.

In the Japanese novel The Tale of Genji, the title character poetically likens one of his many love interests to a cicada for the way she delicately sheds her scarf the way a cicada sheds its shell when moulting. A cicada shell also plays a role in the manga Winter Cicada. They are also a frequent subject of haiku, where, depending on type, they can indicate spring, summer, or fall. Also, in the series Higurashi no Naku Koro ni, cicadas (or higurashi) are a major subject.

In China, the phrase 'to shed off the golden cicada skin'(金蝉脱壳) is the poetic name of the tactic of using deception to escape danger, specifically of using decoys (leaving the old shell) to fool enemies. It became one of the 36 classic Chinese stratagems. In the Chinese classic Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Diaochan also got her name from the sable (diào) tails and jade decorations in the shape of cicadas (chán), which at the time adorned the hats of high-level officials. In the Chinese classic Journey to the West, the protagonist Priest of Tang was named the Golden Cicada; in this context the multiple shedding of shell of the cicada symbolizes the many stages of transformation required of a person before all illusions have been broken and one reaches enlightenment. This is also referred to in Japanese mythical ninja lore, as the technique of utsusemi (i.e., literally cicada), where ninjas would trick opponents into attacking a decoy.
 

 

 




 

Vintage Japanese Insence Case, Kogo, Kyo ware, Cow
It's very good condition. No cracks, No chips. £60

L 1.8"(4.6cm) x W 2.6"(6.5cm) x H1.5 (3.8cm)
This is a vintage Japanese Incense Case of Kyo ware. A cow is moulded.
The seal of the potter is put on the bottom. I can make out

Japanese incense case is called "Kogo". This was made about 70 years ago.

 

 
  i
This is an 18th century style Ceramic Goose made in porcelain in the early part of the 20th century around 1930. £23.50 each of the set of five for £100
A set of five making a 'gaggle of geese' Perfectly for a landscape scene scroll or a bonsai 'Yosue' (Forest)
 
 

Ebisu 恵比須
Origin = Japan.
Shinto Name: Kotoshiro-nushi-no-kami

God of Fishermen, Good Forture, Commerce, and Honest Labor. Virtue = Candor, Fair Dealing

Holds a fish (tai or sea bream, red snapper), which symbolizes luck and congratulation (Japanese word for happy occasion is omede-tai); fishing rod in right hand; folding fan in other; grants success to people in their chosen occupations; son of Daikoku. Popular among fishing folk, sailors, and people in the food industry

Jurōjin 寿老人
Origin = China. Identified with Laozi (Jp. = Rōjinseishi), the founder of Chinese Toaism

God of Wisdom & Longevity. Virtue = Longevity.

Also spelled Jurojin.

Long white beard, knobbly staff with scoll of life attached; tortoise, deer, stag, crane; in same body as Fukurokuju (the pair represent two different manifestations of the same deity); scroll said to hold the secret to longevity; sometimes carries a drinking vessel, as he reportedly loves rice wine (sake). Popular among teachers, professors, and scientists

 

 

Ebisu 恵比須
Origin = Japan.
Shinto Name: Kotoshiro-nushi-no-kami

God of Fishermen, In Blanc de Chine,
White porcelain dating from the early 18th century

With stand. This is a small statue 1.5 inches tall.£45

The Shichifukujin 七福神 are an eclectic group of deities from Japan, India, and China. Only one is native to Japan (Ebisu) and Japan's indigenous Shintō tradition. Three are from the Hindu-Buddhist pantheon of India (Daikokuten, Bishamonten, & Benzaiten) and three from Chinese Taoist-Buddhist traditions (Hotei, Jurōjin, & Fukurokuju). In Japan, they travel together on their treasure ship (Takarabune) and visit human ports on New Year's Eve to dispense happiness to believers. Each deity existed independently before Japan's "artificial" creation of the group. The origin of the group in unclear -- some say the Muromachi Era (1392-1568), others the 17th century. Today, images of the seven appear with great frequency in Japan. By the 19th century, most major cities had developed special pilgrimage circuits for the seven. These pilgrimages remain well trodden today, but many people now use cars, buses, and trains to move between the sites.

 



 

Bishamonten 毘沙門天
Origin = India.
Skt. Vaisravana.God of Treasure, Bringer of Wealth, Defender of the Nation, Scourge of Evil Doers, Healer of Illness. Virtue = Dignity

Wears armour, carries spear and treasure pagoda; centipede is messenger; Vaisravana in Sanskrit; also known as Tamonten (the commander of the Shitenno or Four Heavenly Kings), and a member of the TENBU Popular among soldiers, doctors, and certain Buddhist monasteries; the only member of the Shitenno worshipped independently



 

Jurōjin 寿老人
Origin = China. Identified with Laozi (Jp. = Rōjinseishi), the founder of Chinese Toaism God of Wisdom & Longevity. Virtue = Longevity.
Also spelled Jurojin. Long white beard, knobbly staff with scroll of life attached; tortoise, deer, stag, crane; in same body as Fukurokuju (the pair represent two different manifestations of the same deity); scroll said to hold the secret to longevity; sometimes carries a drinking vessel, as he reportedly loves rice wine (sake). Popular among teachers, professors, and scientists

 
 

 

Chinese Deity figure of Kwan-yin

Chinese figure of Kwan-yin standing on a lotus blossom,
which is one of the main symbols of Buddhist purity, since
it a beautiful flower that grows out of mud. The meaning is
that our hearts should be pure like the lotus flower, even
though our lives might be surrounded by dirty (or impure)
people and situations.


"Although I am Bodhisattva, I am energy. I am not a
person. Really, the Kwan Yin energy was never in
one single body. It has always been a great part of
the energy of ALL the Universe."
--Kwan Yin


There are numerous other
forms of Kwan Yin throughout
Asia; in Japan alone there are
33 different manifestations.
You will find shrines dedicated
to her not only in China, but in
Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia,
Korea, Japan, Laos, Malaysia,
Singapore, Thailand and Viet
Nam. You will find images of
her not only at Buddhist
temples, but also in Taoist
and Confucian temples.

Known as The Goddess of Mercy, Gentle Protectoress, Bodhisattva of Compassion, even the
saviour of seamen and fishermen, she holds many titles. The spelling of her name varies, but it is
not so much the arrangement of letters as it is the effect that her spoken name produces on those
with a Buddhist background, similar to a reaction in the West when one is speaking of the Virgin
Mary. In both cases, it invokes the feeling of compassion and unconditional love. Indeed, her force
is compared to Mother Mary in the West, Green Tara in the Tibetan culture, the Virgin of
Guadeloupe in Mexico, and many other ancient goddesses, the matriarchy of old. You might call
her the Buddhist Madonna, or, as She calls Herself, "The Mother of all Buddha's".

By her own words, she is a complex energy presence. Thus, when asked her about her
incarnations as "Kwan Yin," this involves many persons that have embodied and reflected this
energy in their lives on earth, as far as we can understand. According to Sucheta's channelling,
the closest association of Kwan Yin being linked to a person energetically in recent times is Miao
Shan, an ancient Chinese princess who was known for her great compassion. Here is a quote
from Kwan Yin about this:

"Although I am Bodhisattva, I am energy. I am not a person. Basically, the Kwan Yin energy was
never in one single body. It has always been a great part of the energy of all of compassion of all
the Universe. What you see in front of you [Marjorie] is one person who has been able to tap in and
release for a period of time, so that she can let us be a part of her reality and to share that with you
so that you can be encouraged, and that you can also bring forward the part of you that knows the
truth."

The name "Kwan Yin" is a derivation of a Chinese name for the goddess that is this energy of
motherly compassion. This is really a description of her energy ("she who hears the cries of the
people") which has become accepted as her name on earth. Although there are variations, the
feeling is the same. She responds to the heartfelt needs and anguish of the people of earth
regardless of background or belief.

Being one of the "mother" goddesses, she is especially connected to those in need of any kind of
help, be they sick, lost, frightened or simply in unfortunate circumstances. She is a great protector
and benefactor of the weak, the ill and especially the children and the babies. Many erect alters to
Kwan Yin, the "bestower of children" -- the one who hears the prayers of anyone wanting to
conceive a child -- to increase their fertility. There is a connection with the care of souls, both during
birth and after death. Taoists invoke her presence to free newly departed souls from the judgement
of the underworld. She guards the souls of the newborn and guides them to their new parents.

Her range of influence is vast, from China to Korea and Japan, all the way down into Malaysia. She
has super-ceded her Buddhist traditions and jumped into the realm of a more universally
venerated goddess, now known to those of many different faiths and sects. Her image can be
found on most any alter of worship in temples, homes, schools, shops, restaurants, out of the way
grottos and even on the dashboards of taxis.

Entwined in the faith of Buddhism, her first real appearance in literature seems to be around 400
AD. By that time, Buddhism had been around for nearly 1000 years, spreading from its birthplace
in India to China, and subsequently to Korea, Japan and Tibet. Devotees of Avalokitesvara, or
Avalokita, Bodhisattva of Compassion of Indian Buddhism, brought the concept of Avalokita to
China. There, Avalokita, or Kwan Yin, was adopted as a god in the male form and later was
gradually changed by some to resemble a female, lending a rather androgynous element to her.
By 1200 AD she was definitely a female portrayed in flowing robes.

Avalokita is depicted with many arms, hands and heads, sometimes with an eye in each palm
representing the ever watchful omnipresent mother, ready to immediately reach out in any direction
to alleviate suffering. In Buddhist mythology, it states that Avalokita was born from Amitabha
Buddha's right eye, after which he proclaimed, "Om Mani Padme Hum" -- Hail to the jewel in the
lotus -- a sentiment of her preciousness to him. Some believe she is actually an incarnation of
Amitabha Buddha. The Chinese translation of the Sanskrit Avalokita is Kuan shih Yin, the full form
of the shortened Kuan Yin, or Kwan Yin.

It is said in ancient writings that she was embodied as Miao Shan (whose name means
"wonderfully kind one"), a Chinese princess who lived about 700 BC. This legendary Buddhist
saint is said to have spent nine years living on an island off the coast of China, healing, meditating
and saving sailors from shipwreck. This island became a place of worship and pilgrimage for
many, especially in one of the caves there, which was transformed into a shrine dedicated to Kwan
Yin.

She is called a Bodhisattva, literally a "being of bodhi, or enlightenment." Bodhi is the spiritual
energy that produces an urge for enlightenment, emanating Wisdom and Compassion. The
Buddha's are the primary stream from this energy, the secondary stream from the Buddha's being
the Bodhisattva. A Bodhisattva is any soul which has attained enlightenment and has freed itself
from the karmic cycle of rebirth, but which has forgone the bliss of Nirvana, the merging with the
Creator, in order to help all the rest attain their enlightenment. This is their vow. It is said that as
she was about to enter heaven, she paused at the threshold as the cries of the world reached her
ears, and she returned to help them. She is also called an Ascended Master, which essentially
means that one has learned all their lessons, transmuted their karma, and is not compelled to
experience being reborn into a physical body if they do not desire it.

In depictions she is shown with pearls of illumination in one hand; and with the other she pours
out "sweet dew", the nectar of Wisdom and Compassion from a small vase, blessing all with
physical and spiritual peace. Her cupped hands are a symbol of the womb and the universal
feminine principal. She sometimes holds a sheaf of ripe rice, a metaphor for sustenance
supplied. The dragon is often seen with her, a symbol of wisdom, strength, and the power of divine
transformation. A Divine Mother, always there are children around her or being held by her. There
are two small attendants that show up periodically, a "young man of excellent capacities" and the
"daughter of the Dragon King," both related to the legendary Miao Shan. As reference to fishermen,
sailors and water, she can be seen on a boat or a lotus flower crossing the sea, rising from the
sea on the back of a dragon. Other things related to her are a dove, a scroll of prayers which are
the teachings of Buddha, a rosary of white crystal beads showing the rounds of rebirth, and a
willow spray with which she sprinkles the divine nectar of life.

To call upon Kwan Yin for compassion, healing and mercy
say, chant, or sing this mantra:
Namo Kuan Shih Yin Pusa
"Hail to the Enlightened
One Who's Voice is Mercy."


 

 
 

(http://www.japanesehangingscrolls.com  http://www.japanesehangingscrolls.co.uk http://www.japanesescrolls.co.uk)