Scrolls

Small size Antiques
Accent items for Bonsai Display or Tokonoma

Tea accoutrements

Suiseki
Viewing Stones

Screens

Lacquer Items, tables , Trays and Suzuribako-writing boxes etc


This is a stand for Sake cups, called Kagetsudai to serve Sake to guests Width;7.1 in : Length 7.1 in : Height 7.1 in
The smaller table is called a Haidai (a sake cup stand) Lacquered Tea Tray 24.5cm x 24cm - 9.6 x 9.4 inches. Good condition. Perfect for display of a Bonsai or Accent.

The larger table  below is called Kakusanbo. To be a table for larger Sakazuki Saki Cups or bowls. This in reality a Shinto Altar called Kakusanbo in black with a family crest.

This Kakusanbo has been designed with a dignified Kamon (family crest) of the Otani family in gold. It was made for a high class family and used for an auspicious occasions as an alter or part of an alter in the home shrine or Tokonoma.. It can be used a flower stand for Suiseki, accent, Ikebana or bonsai. The family crest is Otani. We have made a special Antique silk covered Box specially for this wonderful table £180 inc post  

 

 


The silk covered box for the tea table-dai. Kakusanbo
 
The above group of pictures are from our section on Tea accessories-A selection  of tea bowls, scrolls and teapots gathered from China and Japan- click this line to go there

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 










This is a SAKE cup and stand of Japanese lacquer ware. This was made about 70 years ago.
This is Japanese lacquer at wood. Real Japanese lacquer is used. It is never a plastic.
And the cup has good gold lacquer work called MAKIE.
Designs are a pine tree and a crane. It is a traditional popular design.
MAKIE is made carefully, applying very long days and months.
The old-time craftsman had required several years.
Since high technique and high emotional strength are needed, it is very expensive.
This is the very good SAKE-things seriously made by the specialist.
this will come with a special box created for this table set in antique Kimono silk

We have made a special Antique silk covered Box specially for this wonderful table £180 inc post

Japanese vintage c 1850-1900 Urushi lacquer wood Stand or Box for a Sake cup (Sakazuki).

Tenmokudai, Haidai or called Sakazukidai

It is used to serve Sake in the lacquer Cup (Sakazuki). However the table is ideal as a Bonsai or vase stand in a Tokonoma.

There are a few small losses of lacquer around the edges but overall it looks very nice as you can see.
As a small table it can also be used for a Kengai-cascade Bonsai in Shohin or Chu in sizes.

17.2cm x 17.2cm x h15.6cm(18.5cm in set)

£75

 

This is a beautiful and unusual 19th century Meiji Suzuribako, a Japanese writing box with ink stone.
It has been created in Rose coloured Urushi Lacquer with a sparrow raised on top. The box is in very good condition
Incised lid decoration; Negoro ware Urushi;
Rose Red on Black Lacquer Writing box with brush-rests, ink-stone & water dropper
Traditional High-quality gloss Urushi Lacquer
For use with Shodo Calligraphy utensils


Suzuri Inkstone
Suiteki Water Dropper, Metal, with stand
Tray with fixed metal brush-rests
2-part box, scalloped edge to lid
Brush and piece of Sumi Ink Stick
Contents have been used but are otherwise in good condition
Meiji(1840- 1880)
Size
Box 8.5 x 6.5 x 1.2 inches
Ink-stone 4.9 x 2.5 "

£210

 

Lacquer Table designed for tea but perfect for a small Bonsai

SIZE (Stand) : Width 7.1 in : Length 7.1 in : Height 7.1 in : Weight 450 g

 

 

Chinese square pot stand dating from circa 1800 made in Rosewood.
Has repair to top gadroon. Very small piece missing to bottom edge carving on one side
14cm / 5.5 inches wide Wonderful patina. £165

Please note that I am always looking for interesting old tables and these will mainly be for Suiseki, Antique vases and pots as opposed to Bonsai.

 

size : Length 8" x width 3.5" x height 1.5"(approx)
surface width : Length 7.5 " (19 cm) x Width 3.5 "(9 cm)
Fine grained hardwood.

 

This Chinese made table-Dai measures 3.5 inches square by 1 inch high. It is a vintage wooden display stand (plinth) used to show a vase, bottle, or statue. It was carved out of one solid piece of Ebony wood.
Its age is from the early 20th century and the condition is very good. £75
 

Maki-e Tray: Natural wood is coated with high quality Japanese lacquer with highlights of gold .

About Maki-e

To create different colours and textures, maki-e artists use a variety of metal powders including gold, silver, copper, brass, lead, aluminium, platinum, pewter, as well as their alloys. Bamboo tubes and soft brushes of various sizes are used for laying powders and drawing fine lines. As it requires highly-skilled craftsmanship to produce a maki-e painting, young artists usually go through many years of training to develop the skills and to ultimately become maki-e masters. Kouami Douchou (1410-1478) was the first lacquer master linked to specific works. His maki-e works used designs from various Japanese contemporary painters. Kouami and another maki-e master, Igarashi Shinsai, were originators of the two major schools of lacquer-making in the history of Japan.

Takamakie (or "raised maki-e") is one of the three major techniques in maki-e making. Developed in the Muromachi Period (1336-1573), the technique of takamakie involves building up design patterns above the surface through a mixture of metal powder, lacquer and charcoal or clay dustu
 
 
Lacquer Trays

Japanese lacquered wooden tray. Measures 21" x 11". The dragon edge
design stands in relief. Features colours of black, brown, red and ochre. In very nice condition. £95

Maki-e Tray: Natural wood is coated with high quality Japanese lacquer with highlights of gold .

About Maki-e

To create different colours and textures, maki-e artists use a variety of metal powders including gold, silver, copper, brass, lead, aluminium, platinum, pewter, as well as their alloys. Bamboo tubes and soft brushes of various sizes are used for laying powders and drawing fine lines. As it requires highly-skilled craftsmanship to produce a maki-e painting, young artists usually go through many years of training to develop the skills and to ultimately become maki-e masters. Kouami Douchou (1410-1478) was the first lacquer master linked to specific works. His maki-e works used designs from various Japanese contemporary painters. Kouami and another maki-e master, Igarashi Shinsai, were originators of the two major schools of lacquer-making in the history of Japan.

Takamakie (or "raised maki-e") is one of the three major techniques in maki-e making. Developed in the Muromachi Period (1336-1573), the technique of takamakie involves building up design patterns above the surface through a mixture of metal powder, lacquer and charcoal or clay dust.



A Japanese black lacquered wooden tray with hand painted gold pattern of a geisha being pulled on a rickshaw, the figures, rickshaw and shoreline are inset with abalone and mother of pearl. The tray is generally in good condition,  there are some scratches to the base from age and wear. There are a couple of hairlines in the lacquer on the front although the lacquer is intact. There are some minor chips around the rim conducive with age and wear.
The overall look is a super decorative item. It measures 54.5cm long and 31.5cm across with a lip of about 3.5cm. Very nice early 20th century dating to around 1920  £75


 

Better images in January 19th century large Japanese lacquered tray  slight wear to the edges but in otherwise very good condition. £65

Natural wood is coated with high quality Japanese lacquer.

As it requires highly-skilled craftsmanship to produce a lacquer tray, young artists usually go through many years of training to develop
the skills and to ultimately become masters. Kouami Douchou (1410-1478) was the first lacquer master linked to specific works.
His maki-e works used designs from various Japanese contemporary painters.
Kouami and another maki-e master, Igarashi Shinsai, were originators of the two major schools of lacquer-making in the history of Japan.

Another special kind of maki-e is togidashi maki-e, where a black lacquer without oil is put on the metal decoration as an additional coat.
Another method is to coat the tray and then rub off the lacquer to allow an undercoat of red to come through slightly then repolishing many times giving a very deep colour.