Ando Company Ando Jubei applied silver rim areas Barry Davies birds blue enamel ground bowl brass yusen brown enamel butterflies Chinese chrysanthemum cloisonne enamels cm The copper Coben and Ferster collection copper body counter-enamel dish dragon Exhibition Exposition Fairley floral gold yusen enamels ground is decorated Hayashi Kodenji Height 13 cm Ho-o Hosoge Imperial Japan Inaba Company inner base-plate inner neck-ring interior Japanese Cloisonne 1982 Japanese cloisonne enamels Japanese Enamels jungin mark Kaisuke Kaji Kawasaki Shozo Kyoto Namikawa leaves Meiji no Takara moriage Mount Fuji musen Museum Namikawa Sosuke Namikawa Yasuyuki Pair of vases panels paulownia peony petals pieces Plate plum blossom rim and base-plate rim and silver seal of Namikawa shaded enamels shakudo Shippo shosen enamels silver base-plate silver yusen enamels silver yusen mark silver-gilt similar Taisho period technique Tokyo Toshima Vase Kyoto Vase Nagoya Vase Unsigned vases have applied vessel width 19 cm wires yiisen yusen and shosen New Page 1


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cloisonne

Please note that while I sell cloisonné I also leave the information on some of the items I have sold as a help to buyers who wish to explore this wonderful art form.


A beautiful Cloisonné Vase made by the Ando Company of Japan. Dating from the early part of the 20th century. Shippo Yaki vase designed for Ikebana display. It features a Cattleya Orchid In Japanese called Ran)
Complete with original packing and special lacquered wood Dai. (Table)

Master craftsman, Ando Jubei established his shop in Nagoya in 1881. Instrumental in several cloisonné innovations such as: clear enamel over repousse base, and opaque cloisonné moriage enamel motifs over opaque base, as well as plique-a-jour inspired by a French artist. His chief foremen for workshop production were Kaji Sataro, grandson of Tsunekichi from 1881 to 1897, and in 1897 Kawade Shibataro (1856-1921?), who was innovative and highly skilled. His mark is a gourd inside the ANDO 4 petal round mon or 'Maltese cross'.

sold

Cattleya is a genus of 113 species of orchids from Costa Rica to tropical South America. The genus was named in 1824 by John Lindley after Sir William Cattleywho received and successfully cultivated specimens of Cattleya labiata that were used as packing material in a shipment of other orchids made by William Swainson. The genus is abbreviated C in trade journals.

They are widely known for their large, showy flowers, and were used extensively in hybridisation for the cut-flower trade until the 1980's when pot plants became more popular. This genus and the numerous hybrids come close, through their beauty, to the idealised picture we have of the orchids. The flowers of the hybrids can vary in size from 5 cm to 15 cm or more. They occur in all colours except true blue and black.

The typical flower has three rather narrow sepals and three usually broader petals: two petals are similar to each other, and the third is the quite different conspicuous lip, featuring various markings and specks
and an often frilly margin. At the base, the margins are folded into a tube. Each flower stalk originates from a pseudobulb. The number of flowers varies; it can be just one or two, or sometimes up to ten. As a flower it is widely hybridised and although used as a Corsage it is a popular orchid for collectors of Orchids.
Orchids are versatile and exotic flowers that are perfectly in keeping with the celebratory settings in which you would wear a corsage. Blooming in a range of hues, patterns and sizes, orchids are a relatively long-lasting flower out of water and grow on sturdy stems that are ideal for corsages. Smaller varietals can be massed or single larger blooms highlighted in corsages worn on the wrist,
on the lapel or at the waist. Catteleya Orchids were more popular in the 1930's to1950's but these older varieties are a little large for modern use unless its one of the smaller hybridised cattelyas

 

 

A beautiful pale blue Cloisonné Vase made by the Ando Company of Japan. Dating from the early part of the 20th century.
Shippo Yaki vase probably designed for Ikebana display. It features two Cattleya Orchids In Japanese called Ran)
It is the same height as the previous Orchid Vase 7.5 inches
Complete with Stand £290

Master craftsman, Ando Jubei established his shop in Nagoya in 1881. Instrumental in several cloisonné innovations such as: clear enamel over repousse base, and opaque cloisonné moriage enamel motifs over opaque base, as well as plique-a-jour inspired by a French artist. His chief foremen for workshop production were Kaji Sataro, grandson of Tsunekichi from 1881 to 1897, and in 1897 Kawade Shibataro (1856-1921?), who was innovative and highly skilled. His mark is a gourd inside the ANDO 4 petal round mon or 'Maltese cross'.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 



 
 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Avery unusual small Japanese Cloisonné plaque measuring circa 12cm x 10 cm enamelled in black on the reverse
and with a complex motif on the front comprising a child's hobby horse executed in colours against
a silver and light green ground scattered with leaves and flowers. Now set into a box frame. Superbly-Photo to come.

 


 

 

      

Superb vase with bird and flowers


Japanese Tea Caddy in Ando style Pigeon Red Cloisonné


Peony and Cherry Cloisonné Vase
5X3X2 inches This is quite a weighty small piece showing the quality of cloisonné. Very tiny loss of colour in one of the blossom petals on the back of this lovely piece has meant that this is reduced from £95

£40

A This is a beautifully crafted Chinese cloisonné brush pot that has a white/ gold background with a stunning orange peony flower in full bloom with two lilac smaller flowers branching off of it, the top and bottom pot decoration have the same green/blue colour as the flowers leaves, the colours are quite a mesmerising combination and make this pot visually stunning. 2¾ inches tall, 2 inches in diameter around the rim and 1¼ inches in diameter around the base sold

 

Sold

 

 

Chinese two sectional cloisonné enamel on Copper vase with
turquoise & cream coloured floral detailed panels on golf adventurine flecked ground. (c.1880-1900) 4 inches tall sold

A charming and pretty Cloisonné jar with Prunus decoration all round. Slight scuff on one tiny part of the lid which is hard to see. But 99% unmarked.

£35


 

Gorgeous Japanese Ando cloisonné vases, early-mid 20th century. Nuanced wireless rendering of
dramatic crane motif under rich apple-green ground on exceptionally beautiful form. Lovely display
 items or centre piece for a dramatic ikebana presentation.






JAPANESE VINTAGE MID SHOWA PERIOD ANDO CLOISONNÉ "SHIPPO YAKI" VASES FEATURING SUBTLE CRANES "TSURU" SET TO A BACKGROUND. EACH VASE COMES WITH ITS ORIGINAL SIGNED KIRI WOOD STORAGE BOX. VASE EACH HAS ITS OWN KARAKI WOOD STAND .TRANSLATIONS OF BOXES ARE AVAILABLE
AGE:C1960CONDITION: GOOD, NO SCRATCHES, DENTS, DINGS OR REPAIRS. 
£245 / $390 EACH






TWO JAPANESE VINTAGE MID SHOWA PERIOD ANDO CLOISONNÉ "SHIPPO YAKI" VASES FEATURING SUBTLE CRANES "TSURU" SET TO A BACKGROUND. EACH VASE COMES WITH ITS ORIGINAL SIGNED KIRI WOOD STORAGE BOX. VASE EACH HAS ITS OWN KARAKI WOOD STAND .TRANSLATIONS OF BOXES ARE AVAILABLE
AGE:C1960CONDITION: GOOD, NO SCRATCHES, DENTS, DINGS OR REPAIRS. 
£245 / $390 EACH 




 


 A  SUPERB BLACK CLOISONNÉ EARLY JAPANESE VASE INLAID WITH PEARL SHELL  , 6 3 /4 INCHES HIGH IN VERY GOOD CONDITION ,
NO CHIPS , NO BREAKS. WHILE SIMILAR IN SOME WAYS TO CHINESE CLOISONNÉ THE QUALITY OF THIS VASE IS CLEARLY JAPANESE.

£75

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

One of the most prestigious manufacturers of Japanese cloisonné is Ando of Nagoya

It was not until the latter part of the Edo period (1600-1868) that Owari cloisonné got its start. The area centered on present-day Nagoya was the domain of the Owari clan. The first pieces were made here and the skills and techniques of this craft gradually became established. The oldest piece of authenticated Owari cloisonné is a sake cup made in 1833.

In a sense, cloisonné is a form of glazed ware utilizing the fact that enamels will melt under extreme heat, rather in the way that glazes for pottery melt in a kiln. The main difference is that metal is the base material of cloisonné. The birds, butterflies, flowers and plants depicted on Owari cloisonné give it its distinctive character.

The crafting of Japanese cloisonné began in the Edo period (c. 1603-1868). It reached its most magnificent stage in the early 1800s with the artist and samurai Kaji Tsunekichi who perfected Japanese cloisonné technique that led to a flourishing export trade and a magnificent art.

The technique involves pouring enamel into wire cells covering a metal body. Japanese cloisonné or Shippo yaki uses many techniques including yusen cloisonné (with wires), musen cloisonné (wireless), shotai or plique-a-jour, ginbari and pigeon blood cloisonné.

One of the most prestigious manufacturers of Japanese cloisonné is Ando of Nagoya

1: Exquisite Japanese cloisonné vase, early-mid 20th century. Nuanced wireless rendering of dramatic crane motif beneath rich apple-green background on exceptionally beautiful form. Lovely display item or platform for dramatic ikebana presentation. Comes with inscribed tomobako kiri wood storage box

2: Gorgeous Japanese Ando cloisonné vase, early-mid 20th century. Nuanced wireless rendering of dramatic Crane motif under rich apple-green ground on exceptionally beautiful form. Lovely display item or platform for dramatic ikebana presentation.  Very good condition
 

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About Cloisonné

The Japanese cloisonné vase. Enamelled, foil backed, Green, blue, lilac, red (pigeon or ox blood) etc.

The process of inlayed enamelling in Japan predates the Nara period (710 to 794), but became more widespread during the 1500s. This coincides with the advent of Chinese fired enamelware ("Blue of Jingtai") during the previous century. The Japanese cloisonné enamelling process was called shippo-yaki, meaning "seven precious things." The enamel paste used to create shippo cloisonné was called doro shippo, or "paste enamel."

The "Golden Age" of Japanese Cloisonné production began in the late Edo period around 1808, and reached its zenith during the Meiji period from 1868 to 1912. During the the late Edo period, Japanese craftsman Tsunekichi Kaji developed a Cloisonné technique called "Yuusen-shippo" that used a delicate filigree wire made of brass, gold, or silver. The fine wire was glued rather than soldered to the base metal.The majority of these early Japanese Cloisonné objects were manufactured for export to Western countries, and the design motifs found in these pieces reflected to tastes of Western collectors who were interested in "Asian" art. The Chinese scroll motif known as karakusa, which depicted branches and leaves was popularized during this shippo-yaki period.

Owari Cloisonné from Shippo-cho

The shippo cloisonné craft was centred around Tojima Village (now Shippo-cho), in Owari Province (now Aichi Prefecture) near Nagoya. One of the oldest known piece of Owari cloisonné is a sake cup from 1833 Early pioneers in Japanese Owari cloisonné techniques were Nagoya/Owari craftsmen Kaji Tsunekichi (1808 to 1883), Hayashi Kodenji (1831 to 1915), Ando Jubei, and Kawade Shibataro. Both Ando and Kawade introduced the French art of Piqué-à-jour cloisonné into their creations.

With the assistance of a German chemist named Gottfried von Wagner , the development of new methods for firing enamel provided the ability to create large fields of background colour that were uninterrupted by multiple cell divisions.

By the late 1800s, the cloisonné craft made its way to Kyoto, where a local craftsman named Namikawa Yasuyuki made improvements to the art-form. So-called Kyoto shippo is distinguished by the use of gilt wire.

One of the most significant developments in the art of Owari Cloisonné was made by Namikawa Sosuke (1847 to 1910) in 1879, when he developed a technique for creating totally wireless enamelware. The total elimination of wire enabled the artisan to create elaborate scenic designs that were not possible with wire.

Akasuke is often referred to as "pigeon blood" and Gin Bari is cloisonné which has a highly detailed silver foil (or metal) base. The metal base is often embellished with floral designs which complement the technique. The technique of transparent akasuke enamelling was perfected by Ota Jinnoei in 1880/81. Some vases have silver and gilded wires, much finer than those used in many cloisonné' pieces. The colours of the patterns are beautifully shaded from pale to darker colours, and the leaves are also portrayed from pale to dark.

The neck and foot of some vases have silver or silver plated mounts.

A little more about cloisonné technique.

Cloisonné is an enamelling technique which consists of soldering to a metal surface delicate metal strips bent to the outline of a design and filling the resulting cellular spaces, called cloisonné (French: “partitions” or “compartments”), with vitreous enamel paste. The object then is fired, then more enamel is added and it is fired again. Finally, when the enamel is higher than the wires, it is ground smooth, and polished. Sometimes metal wire is used in place of the usual gold, brass, silver, or copper strips. Japanese cloisonné is considered one of the most refined, and foil techniques for cloisonné were invented in Japan in the 1880's. More recently wire free cloisonné has been created using under pattern techniques allowing subtle shapes to come through. These techniques have been refined by such makers as Ando.

 



 

Owari Cloisonné: An outstanding small deep emerald green vase that is 2.2 x 3.7 inches tall.
The inlay work on the undamaged surface is of Bamboo. An almost Faberge style of work.
This comes with a stand. A very elegant and beautiful example of Cloisonné from the early
20th century. £155 under offer

JAPANESE SATO-ANDO BASSE-TAILLE VASE.This is an akasuke, emerald cloisonne vase, with clear enamel applied to stippled metal base, and decorated with opaque floral cloisonne motifs. by  SATO CLOISONNE of Japan.

FROM THE TAISHO PERIOD (1912-1926) THIS GORGEOUS VASE MADE IN WIRELESS CLOISONNE.

THE EXTERIOR HAS A TRANSPARENT EMERALD GREEN ENAMEL WHICH ALLOWS THE UNDERLYING HAMMERED TEXTURE WITH BAMBOO LEAF DESIGN TO SHOW THROUGH. . THIS TECHNIQUE CREATES A JEWEL LIKE BACKGROUND AS THE BASSE-TAILLE TECHNIQUE REFLECTS MORE LIGHT AND GREAT DEPTH OF COLOR.

THE VASE IS FURTHER EMBELLISHED WITH SILVER OR NICKEL SILVER TOP AND BOTTOM BANDS. Sold


A Chinese vase dating from the 1920's.
Superb detail. In very nice condition. 13X4cm

Black ground with detailed Azalea flowers

Makers mark on the bottom (T) Complete with stand.

A silk covered box will be made for this beautiful vase.

£85

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




A superb antique Japanese Sato cloisonné vase with pretty floral detail
and in very good condition on the front of the vase but has slight damage on the back as
shown in photos. The vase measure 15.2cms -6.2 inches tall. With stand and specially made silk covered box to fit.
Sold






A rare pigeon blood Japanese cloisonné vase with two birds and bamboo.

Condition: Very good, no cracks or repairs.

Size: 5" tall X 4.5" wide

£225 including wood stand and siljk covered Box to fit.

 

under offer

 

 

 

 

 

 



A rose pink Cloisonné vase 8 inches tall with a Peacock and chrysanthemum motif

Chinese from the early part of the 20th century around 1905. This is silver wired. SOLD



Dark Red Cloisonné enamel Tea Caddy-possibly Ando. Cedar wood lined with silver coloured white metal structure
Height 3" (7.5cm), height of bottom (excluding collar) 2" (5cm), diameter 2 3/8" (6cm).
sold




A nicely worked Chinese cloisonné ginger jar with cover, dating from the late 1900. The jar is decorated with flowers and foliage to a finely wire-worked cream ground. The interior and base of the piece in enamelled in sky blue - the gilt edges exposed. 
Condition is very good. One tiny almost miniscule  loss to enamel on shoulder.
The piece is 10 cm high (approx 4"). £70



 


JAPANESE CLOISONNÉ Kowari-Censer ON 3 LEGS. FLOWER PATTERN ENAMELLED ALL OVER.
7 CMS HIGH 8 CMS WIDE. GOOD CONDITION £30



Very Rare 19th Century Japanese Koro in the Namikawa style.

A beautiful example of Japanese Cloisonné work circa 1890.

Very intricate wire work on brass with amazingly detailed cloisonné.

It measures 13.5cm high and 10.4cm across.  £120


BASSE-TAILLE Ginbari cloisonné vase stands 4.75" tall. Sato

FROM THE TAISHO PERIOD (1912-1926) THIS GORGEOUS VASE MADE IN WIRELESS CLOISONNÉ.

THE EXTERIOR HAS A TRANSPARENT EMERALD GREEN ENAMEL WHICH ALLOWS THE UNDERLYING HAMMERED TEXTURE  DESIGN TO SHOW THROUGH. The plum blossom pattern is further enhanced by graded colour on the trunk to reflect natural bark. THIS TECHNIQUE CREATES A JEWEL LIKE BACKGROUND AS THE BASSE-TAILLE TECHNIQUE REFLECTS MORE LIGHT AND GREAT DEPTH OF COLOUR.

THE VASE IS FURTHER EMBELLISHED WITH SILVER OR NICKEL SILVER TOP AND BOTTOM BANDS. Basse-taille (Basse-taille) is an enamelling technique in which the artist creates a low-relief pattern in metal, usually silver or gold, by engraving or chasing. The entire pattern is created in such a way that its highest point is lower than the surrounding metal. A translucent enamel is then applied to the metal, allowing light to reflect from the relief and creating an artistic effect.

Sold



 




Two Antique Cloisonné Brass Japanese Vases with Floral design Meiji period.c.1910 One is in very good condition.
The other has a little dent but the cloisonné is all there and it displays very nicely. Size 6 1/4" tall, 4" wide

£90 for the perfect one and the other is free. Both with stands


A Chinese Cloisonné Enamel Ginger pot with lid. This is in a similar style of Cloisonné to the Russian Cloisonné techniques. However, this very elegant little box is lightly worked using the background of metal as the canvas for the flowers and leaves of the glass enamelling. Diameter 9 cm (3.5"), height 9.5 cm (4") c1920

£75 including stand


 

 

 



This is a lovely vintage green Japanese Cloisonné enamel dish. 9.5 cm / 3.7 inches wide

The dish is in nice condition but it does show some very minor wear to the right of the central double circle pattern just off the centre as shown in the picture. It is otherwise in very clean and good condition. Comes with wood stand

£34-including post

 


A nice old Cloisonné and painted Picture dish on brass
Designed with butterfly and lotus flower. Good patina and nice colours

9.5 inches across by 2.5 inches high

£15-plus £5 post anywhere

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

A lovely Japanese black Porcelain cloisonné brush pot 3.5 inches tall circa 1900 .
Elegant garlands in the European style.
sold




 

 





A very unusual and quite beautiful Chinese cloisonné Bottle with Hexagonal lid This bottle is a shade under 5 inches tall. The shape is six sided and the sides are decorated with floral and figure motifs of the Goddess  Kwan Yin. The bottle is in very good condition. £65

 


 



 


A very beautiful little mid 20th century Japanese white porcelain vase hand painted in a Cloisonné style. 3.75 inches tall.
White background with a cart filled with flowers. Ideal as a bud vase £15.95



 


A pair of wonderful Cobalt Blue and gold cloisonné vases from the 1930’s. Made in China these are beautifully crafted. They are the traditional five toed Ming period Dragons. The design is exceptional as the dragons are woven in such a way that you have to really look for them and when you do find them you wonder why you did not notice them immediately, Made by a true cloisonné artist of the highest calibre. No damage to speak of. No dents, scratches or breaks.
The vases are 8 inches tall by 4.5 inches wide

Sold as a pair. The price is £125 for the pair including stands


Antique Cloisonné


The crafting of Japanese cloisonné began in the Edo period (c. 1603-1868). It reached its most magnificent stage in the early 1800s with the artist and samurai Kaji Tsunekichi who perfected Japanese cloisonné technique that led to a flourishing export trade and a magnificent art.

 

·   Here is a 50's era SATO cloisonné mark. The circle design was part of a seal that originally said Quality Guaranteed and Trade Mark.

Sato  Stamp     Not to be confused with this 'Maltese Cross mark for Ando
 

·   During the 1950's, Sato pieces were stamped on the bottom,

·   Transparent Red colour is called Pigeon Blood. The 50's pigment is made with Gold, but it is always RED.

·   Top and bottom edges of finished SATO pieces were trimmed with silver or (more commonly) nickel silver bands.

·   The base of 50's Sato Ware is sheet copper.

·   More than 17 Named designs / combinations were available in Sato's 1950's brochure. No wireless designs were offered.

·        ANDO

 

Master craftsman, Ando Jubei established his shop in Nagoya in 1881. Instrumental in several cloisonné innovations such as: clear enamel over repousse base, and opaque cloisonné moriage enamel motifs over opaque base, as well as plique-a-jour inspired by a French artist. His chief foremen for workshop production were Kaji Sataro, grandson of Tsunekichi from 1881 to 1897, and in 1897 Kawade Shibataro (1856-1921?), who was innovative and highly skilled. His mark is a gourd inside the ANDO 4 petal round mon or 'maltese cross'.

 


Types of Cloisonné: Jippo /Shippo

Un-enameled “blank” vase that shows a tsuiki-jippo technique
Fa Hua

Garasu-Jippo Enameled glass

Ginbari-Jippo Silver foil covered base over a foundation metal, typically copper or brass

Gindai-Jippo Enamelware on a silver base or foundation

Imbedded enamel

Moriage-Jippo Raised up or piled up enamel

Musen-Jippo Without wire, wireless enamel
Egaku-Jippo Painted enamel

Sukashi-Jippo Bodies that utilize standard cloisonné, but some cells are left un-enameled or open

Shotai-Jippo Eliminated base or body cloisonné enamel

Tomei-Jippo Transparent / Monochrome Cloisonne Enamel

Totai Shippo Cloisonné enamel in which a ceramic, earthenware or porcelain body is utilized

Tsuiki-Jippo Raised design and enameled

Cloison Wire Selected cloison wiring techniques

Yaku-Jippo Items serving a utilitarian purpose

Yusen-Jippo Standard wire cloisonné enamel

Zogan-Jippo Champleve – Base metal is recessed and enamel applied in those recessed area

Porcelain Cloisonné: Enamel on a Porcelain base.


 


 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

Scrolls Pages 

(http://www.japanesehangingscrolls.com  http://www.japanesehangingscrolls.co.uk http://www.japanesescrolls.co.uk)

 
We exhibited at the Best of British Bonsai 2011 and 2013 exhibitions in Birmingham
and at the 2012, 2013 2014 and 2015 Arco exhibition in Italy, various exhibitions in
Germany, Austria, Poland and throughout the UK where we showed
Scrolls, Suiseki and Singing Bowls.
 



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